All Posts By

justinpark

A Season to Forget

By | Performance, Racing | One Comment

“Sometimes you eat the bar, and sometimes the bar eats you.” – The Stranger, The Big Lebowski Backtrack to early February 2017. I had just finished what amounted to the single-best offseason of training in my career. I had not missed a workout – not a single session – in 12 consecutive weeks. And after a few down days of recovery, I was about to begin the transition into a more specific, race-preparation block of training. In a season where the Ironman 70.3 World Championship was set to take place in Chattanooga, Tennessee – merely a 2-hour drive from my…

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An Update Long Overdue

By | Racing | 3 Comments

There has been a tremendous amount of radio silence on my end over the past couple of months, and for that I apologize. Truthfully, the large reason for my lack of update has been the fact that, for lack of a better answer, I was training my tail off. With some of my continued health struggles rearing their ugly heads at the end of last season, my coach and I decided to take an entirely different approach to my training. Specifically, we were going to train easy – as in, very little intensity. Because of that, however, we were going…

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Do You Know How to Sleep?

By | Health | No Comments

Imagine if there were a pill or action that we could take through which, without any additional work or effort, we could improve cardiovascular health, increase brain function, build more muscle, and boost our moods and mental state. How much would you be willing to pay for access to this “magical” elixir? Before you reach for your wallet, you should know that you already have access to this mysterious performance enhancer. It’s called “sleep,” and it is one of the most forgotten and neglected health benefits in our society. Instead of recognizing sleep for the amazing improvements in health that…

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Master the Offseason

By | Health, Performance | No Comments

For many, the offseason is a time to kick back, reflect on the past season, hang up the equipment for several weeks (or months), and cheat a little bit on the diet. And the reality is, for a set period of time, that perspective is warranted and necessary. Mountains of hard work and sacrifice have been put in over the course of the year, and the body (and mind) simply cannot handle that level of focus and stress without taking a break to rest and recover. However, for a large portion of athletes, that period of time lingers much longer…

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Zero Steps Forward, Two Steps Back

By | Health, Performance | 3 Comments

For those of you who keep tabs on my career and my racing schedule (all 8 of you), you may have noticed that I have been absent from competition for quite some time. I safely can tell you that my lack of participation lately certainly was not part of the plan. After a midseason break that encompassed the end of July and beginning of August, the plan was to ramp the training back up relatively quickly and return to racing at Ironman 70.3 Santa Cruz on September 11. I followed up 70.3 Vineman with three incredibly solid weeks of training,…

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My Rules on Nutrition

By | Nutrition | No Comments

Through my racing, consulting and speaking, the topic that I get asked about most, without question, is nutrition. People want to know what they should eat, when to eat, what to avoid, and how much to consume. Even those inquisitive individuals who do their own research and investigation become confused by all of the discussion that exists in regards to diet. Indeed, the further you dig, the more you may be subject to paralysis by analysis. The fact is, while there is an amazing amount of valuable and informative information available, there remains a lot that we simply don’t know…

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The Cost of Doing Business: Ironman 70.3 Mont Tremblant

By | Performance, Racing | No Comments

Everyone likely has heard the phrase “the cost of doing business.” The basic premise of the phrase is that, in order to participate in a particular marketplace, a business or organization must incur certain costs (both good and bad). Take, for example, a company that makes the decision to go public and list itself on a stock exchange. The benefit of doing so is that the company may now raise funds from the public sector, which offers much more money for investment. However, the cost associated with going public is that the company is now responsible for completing numerous filings…

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Ironman 70.3 Raleigh: Practice What I Preach

By | Racing | No Comments
In speaking with other triathletes, as well as executives that I work with in my consulting practice, I frequently get asked about mental strategy, focus and goal setting. It is not surprising that those questions come up so regularly; nearly everyone has strong ambitions and clear objectives of wanting to better themselves in a variety of ways. The principal component that I always emphasize is the need to focus on process over outcome. Or, for another way of phrasing, focusing only on that which you can control. The idea is very simple in theory: worry only about the aspects of...
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Oh Tennessee River: Ironman 70.3 Chattanooga

By | Racing | No Comments

Ironman 70.3 Chattanooga marked my first return to real racing—and by “real,” I mean back competing against some of the best triathletes in the world—since being hit by a car last September. I had performed a test run, competing at a smaller Olympic distance race about a month before this one, but there were still many, many questions about my fitness level; my performance; and, most importantly, my confidence and psyche. My training leading into 70.3 Chattanooga had been largely low key. I had accumulated a solid amount of volume, but after so many months without focused training while my…

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A Return to Racing

By | Racing | No Comments

When a car struck me while riding on the morning of September 2, 2015, despite finding myself in an emergency room and requiring my cycling kit to be cut off from my body, I still had the belief that I would be able to compete at my next event in two weeks. Perhaps that conviction was simply the steadfast resolve of a committed athlete. Or more likely, perhaps such an inane belief was precipitated by a head injury sustained during the accident. Once the diagnosis came in with several fractures, a concussion, and mountains of road rash and severe abrasions;…

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